TRI Workouts

Swimming

Here is my workout routine.
Total = 2,000 Yards
Warm-up
200 Yards – Freestyle – easy focus on long and slow strokes and full extension of your arms
Main Set this is with hand paddles and leg bouy
1,300 Yards Total
6 sets of the following:
  • 1 lap breathing every 3rd stroke
  • 1 lap breathing every 5th stroke
  • 1 lap breathing every 7th stroke
  • 1 lap breathing every 9th stroke
Cool down
1 lap breast
1 lap backstroke
Strength training 40 pushups
  • 1 length freestyle , pop out of pool and do 10 pushups on the deck
  • 2 lengths freestyle, pop out of pool and do 10 pushups on the deck
  • 2 lengths freestyle, pop out of pool and do 10 pushups on the deck
  • 2 lengths freestyle, pop out of pool and do 10 pushups on the deck
Cool down
freestyle for remaining distance, focus on slow and elongated Strokes. Try using some drills as well.
Drills to mix in
Hand drag drill – Swim freestyle normally, but during the recovery phase drag your hand through the water. Keep your hand rigid for added resistance (i.e. don’t just drag your hand limply through the water).
Catch up freestyle – Catch-up freestyle helps isolate arm movement, which is good for teaching young swimmers proper mechanics, helps with distance per stroke, while it also promotes a hand entry that doesn’t cross-over.

 

Fist Swimming

Swimming with hands completely in a fist. No “karate-chop” hands allowed! Concentrate on body position, using your forearm in the catch and optimum elbow bend through the stroke. When you return to swimming with an open palm, your hands will feel as large as kickboards! Have fun and think Distance Per Stroke!

Sculling

Sculling is performed by sweeping your hands through the water, holding your elbows still. Your hands are acting like propeller blades, and subtle changes in hand pitch and speed will change your body position and speed. There is no recovery motion. When you are treading water, you are sculling your hands through the water to hold yourself up and counteract gravity. To propel yourself down the pool, simply change your hand and forearm angle to be perpendicular to the pool bottom and parallel with the pool walls. Keep your elbows high at the surface of the water, and sweep your hands underneath (this is known as the “windshield wiper” drill). Note that your swimming strokes are a combination of sculling motions that allow you to hold the water as your large body core muscles act as the engine.

Gallop Drill

This is the same as the 6-Count Drill above, but you take three strokes as you switch from side to side. Focus on long strokes and quick hips in these three strokes, completely rotating from one side to the other. Maintain great body position while kicking on your side!